once a jolly swagman camped by a billabong

beinggigantic:

i listen to harsh noise before i play basketball to get me uneasy and ready for physical activity

0e3:

KTM RC8 1190 V-twin

im freakin drooling, okay

karenhurley:

Smart ideas for Smarter cities

gasoline-station:

Foggy Dubai
Picture: This breathtaking view from the Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building, shows a thick blanket of smoggy fog smothering Dubai. The mist almost completely covers the skyscrapers which dominate the skyline.
© Bjoern Lauen/Solent News - Source

gasoline-station:

Foggy Dubai

Picture: This breathtaking view from the Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building, shows a thick blanket of smoggy fog smothering Dubai. The mist almost completely covers the skyscrapers which dominate the skyline.

© Bjoern Lauen/Solent News - Source


Death blowing bubbles on ‘wallpaper’..

Death blowing bubbles on ‘wallpaper’..

this image has power

this image has power


Ktm 1190 Rc8 R

this is The Goal
Ktm 1190 Rc8 R
this is The Goal

Amazon Indian Warriors Beat and Strip Illegal Loggers in Battle for Jungle’s Future

A group of warriors from Brazil’s indigenous Ka’apor tribe tracked down illegal loggers in the Amazon, tied them up, stripped them and beat them with sticks.

Photographer Lunae Parracho followed the Ka’apor warriors during their jungle expedition to search for and expel illegal loggers from the Alto Turiacu Indian territory in the Amazon basin.

Tired of what they say is a lack of sufficient government assistance in keeping loggers off their land, the Ka’apor people, who along with four other tribes are the legal inhabitants and caretakers of the territory, have sent their warriors out to expel all loggers they find and set up monitoring camps.

Last year, the Brazilian government said that annual destruction of its Amazon rain forest jumped by 28 percent after four straight years of decline. Based on satellite images, it estimated that 5,843 square kilometres of rain forest were felled in the one-year period ending July 2013.

The Amazon rain forest is considered one of the world’s most important natural defences against global warming because of its capacity to absorb huge amounts of carbon dioxide. Rain forest clearing is responsible for about 75 percent of Brazil’s emissions, as vegetation is burned and felled trees rot. Such activity releases an estimated 400 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every year, making Brazil at least the sixth-biggest emitter of carbon dioxide gas.

Photos: Lunae Parracho/Reuters